July 25, 2014
The Cast of Sherlock 
Notice all the characters are smiling (even John Watson looks like he is about to smile) except Sherlock. I don’t think he had any intention of smiling from the start. Instead of a smile, we are looking at a smirk; a smirk that says ‘I was forced to pose with these dull-headed people called friends’. 
My obsession with this show is clearly starting to get out of control.
P.S - Badly missing the skull in this image!

The Cast of Sherlock 

Notice all the characters are smiling (even John Watson looks like he is about to smile) except Sherlock. I don’t think he had any intention of smiling from the start. Instead of a smile, we are looking at a smirk; a smirk that says ‘I was forced to pose with these dull-headed people called friends’. 

My obsession with this show is clearly starting to get out of control.

P.S - Badly missing the skull in this image!

July 25, 2014
Phoebe Buffay and Chandler Bing talk about a lawyer friend with a face ass. Ben Affleck’s previous superhero role was Matt Murdock, a lawyer who moonlights as Daredevil. 
Could this BE more perfect??

Phoebe Buffay and Chandler Bing talk about a lawyer friend with a face ass. Ben Affleck’s previous superhero role was Matt Murdock, a lawyer who moonlights as Daredevil. 

Could this BE more perfect??

July 17, 2014
The Writer’s Block

image

At some point of time, writers have and will be led to believe that writing is the most miserable job. The reasons are not one but many. One, the writer falls prey to the guilty pleasure of watching too many movies that have less or zero IQ attached to them. Given the current predicament of movies and their respective never-ending sequels where the viewers are forced, against their god given will, to watch the rest of the franchise in 3D, it should be of no surprise that quality of the said medium has taken a backseat. Two, the writer has been exposed to bad writing. While bad movies can distance you from the realm of intelligence for a temporary period of time, exposure to bad writing can scar your intellectual capacity for the rest of life. There is, of course, a third reason why writers loathe themselves; The Writer’s Block.

It becomes my rightful duty to let you know this particular piece of writing was devised as a mechanism to escape the writer’s block. I call it a ‘piece of writing’ because I am not sure if this is an article or a post. Laziness has stopped me from researching. With vindictive pleasure, I sincerely hope the same happens to my counterparts.

When Twitter took over the microblogging platform, all ideas and updates were made to look attractive within a meager amount of 140 characters. Considerable changes have happened on this particular social media platform but the founders have taken the ‘micro’ in microblogging far too seriously. For avid readers, elaborateness is oddly satisfying. It is unfair to take that away from them. It makes me wonder if Samuel Taylor Coleridge volunteered to have his first and middle names changed to ‘S.T’ so he could fit into tweets disguised as quotes. Otherwise, it would have been too demotivating for Coleridge’s ghost when it realized that quotes and extracts from the convoluted poem about mariners and albatross were tweeted without crediting the actual source.

The usual defense mechanism for the writer’s block is attempting to make the writing look sophisticated. When vocabulary hinges on esoteric words, the ruse is evident. It is as evident as the fact that I learnt the word ‘esoteric’ two minutes before typing this sentence. There are times when your own writing questions its purpose of being written. When one fails to answer, everything else spirals down. You are reluctantly pulled back into a world where hashtags have replaced sentences. If you have a flippant disregard for incessant hashtags, we need to hang out more often.

Ever since I came across a quote by Fitzgerald on exclamation marks and how he seemed to think their usage was obnoxious, I have been earnestly avoiding them. Paraphrasing Fitzgerald, exclamation marks are like laughing at your own jokes.

Another aspect of the writer’s block is the topic. What you will be writing about is equally important as how you will be writing it. One often finds himself at the dead end of the topic when he realizes there are no further thoughts prodding him to go on. When the failure of words begins to thwart, a closed and raging fist points out the index finger, pressing upon the backspace button so hard that it reminisces the tearing up of what you thought would be the manuscript of a masterpiece.  

While I reinstate that writing is sometimes miserable, writing (verb) about writing (noun) is, as a stand-up comedian once said, eternal damnation without relief. You forget where you started and never know when to stop. 

1:56pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZbFA0x1LjgGGN
Filed under: writersblock 
April 10, 2014
Man of Steel - Why didn’t Clark Kent save his father from the tornado?

Source - www.comicbookmovie.com 

This is the scene that has unequivocally divided fans down the middle and has even prompted some diehard Superman supporters to admit that it was stupid and nonsensical which I find really disappointing, personally I think it was one of the most poignant scenes from a comic book movie in recent years. 

People will inevitably bring up Jonathan’s death by heart attack in the original Superman movie as the perfect example of how to deal with the situation of mortality when it comes to Superman but there is really no specific way Jonathan should die, both of Clark’s parents died of undisclosed causes when Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster first wrote his back story, they left it totally ambiguous so any interpretation is just as legitimate as any other. 

Let’s just establish what purpose Jonathan’s death scene in Superman The Movie served, that Superman was based on the silver age Superman, the strongest Superman that’s ever existed, he was practically an omnipotent and omnipresent God capable of doing anything and everything without even breaking a sweat, so it was important that Jonathan’s death scene in Superman The Movie demonstrated that even Superman couldn’t fix everything, it was important to show both him and us that he was not a God, his powers had limits. 

Everyone knows that David Goyer likes to write in themes, Batman Begins (Fear), The Dark Knight (Chaos), The Dark Knight Rises (Pain) and the Man of Steel (Sacrifice) so keep that in mind, it’s important to understanding what purpose Jonathan’s death scene served in the Man of Steel. 

When Jonathan was talking to a young Clark Kent about saving those kids in the bus, he said, 

"There’s more at stake here than just our lives Clark and the lives of those around us." 

Retrospectively, this was clearly foreshadowing the tornado scene which would drive the entire narrative of the movie forward, Jonathan sacrificed himself for Clark and if you want to know what Jonathan was so afraid of, just watch Flashpoint Paradox, his fears were justified, Clark was still too young, too malleable, too inexperienced, too impulsive and too clueless to survive the weight of the world on his shoulders and Jonathan knew it, Clark was still just a boy at heart. 

Now, remember what I said about how Jonathan’s death scene in Superman The Movie helped demonstrate the limits of Superman’s powers, this was especially important because that silver age version of Superman could sneeze away entire solar systems, manhandle planets and smash through dimensions but Superman in the Man of Steel was considerably less powerful so the same approach wasn’t as necessary as it was in Superman The Movie. 

In the context of the Man of Steel, Jonathan’s death scene is all about sacrifice, not only Jonathan’s sacrifice but it was also setting up Clark’s sacrifice later on in the movie, learning limitations to his powers mattered little in the Man of Steel because he wasn’t so incredibly overpowered to begin with but to learn about sacrifice was paramount for the narrative and development of Superman. Clark sacrificed himself, at least according to Jonathan, for the Earth and in the end he sacrificed Krypton and the future of his own kin, for us, for Earth. 

The fact that Clark could had done A, B and C in the tornado scene is what made that scene so strong, It was a conscious decision by Jonathan and it was not a fluke of destiny ie a heart attack, basically it made the man of steel who he is and who he will become, Earth’s greatest champion, because let’s face it, when Clark finally becomes Superman he sacrifices himself for us 100% and I think Jonathan gave him the courage to do that, Jonathan taught Clark his most defining lesson through his own death and I think that’s rather poetic. 

Clark sacrificing himself for the safety of Earth when Zod first shows up demanding Kal El present himself or else, Superman destroying the world engine on what was very likely a suicide mission, Superman destroying the scout ship, the genesis chamber which was Krypton’s only chance at living again and Superman ultimately killing Zod, the last of his brethren, it was all about sacrifice, that’s what Jonathan’s death taught Clark, selflessness in the face of insurmountable odds which is the absolute epitome of Superman and what he represents. 

Jonathan’s death scene was the underlying pulse of the entire movie, Sacrifice is what the Man of Steel was all about, Superman sacrificing himself, his people and Krypton for us, the ungrateful humans, now that’s some powerful storytelling. 

Jonathan taught Clark his greatest, most valuable and most painful lesson through his own death, whether Jonathan realized it at the time or not simply doesn’t matter, both death scenes were very well done, they were both set up to illustrate two very different narrative structures that would indelibly shape the last son of Krypton into our hero. 

March 9, 2014
Cos he’s Batman!

Cos he’s Batman!

March 8, 2014
Captain America: The Winter Soldier
normal people: spring break
me: winter soldier
March 7, 2014
Sherlock’s Violin
Featuring the unsung motivation of Sherlock Holmes - The Violin

Sherlock’s Violin

Featuring the unsung motivation of Sherlock Holmes - The Violin

March 3, 2014
Leo knows!

Leo knows!

January 2, 2014

A WHITE BIRD PICTURES Production
Cast - PRINCE, HARISH & RAGHAVAN
Story, Cinematography & Direction - MONESH
Original Music Scores - RAGHAVAN
Dialogues - PRINCE, MONESH
Editing & Color Grading - S A S I
Sound Design - DILUXSHAN
Costume Designer - THAMEEM ANSARI
Assistants - CHANDRU, PRAVEEN, CHARLES
Produced by - SABARNA, ASHIRVAD, ARVIND,ARUL, JOHN & ADVETA
Post - Production & Mixing @ TING STUDIO, WHITE BIRD STUDIO
Log on to www.whitebirdpictures.com
Follow us on Facebook - www.facebook.com/whitebirdpictures

November 12, 2013
True inspiration comes from words written over blurry images.

True inspiration comes from words written over blurry images.

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